Internet Safety

Children and young people today are growing up in a digital world. They need support now, more than ever before, to develop the skills they need to navigate safely though the digital landscape, both at home and in school.

They need to be able to balance technology’s benefits with a critical awareness of their own and others’ online behaviour, and develop effective strategies for staying safe and making a positive contribution online.

Teachers and parents/carers also need to develop effective strategies for managing online risk, helping children and young people to stay safe, while maximising the benefits that technology has to offer. Online safety is a whole-school issue that should be addressed in school internet policies and in other policies such as the anti-bullying policy (cyberbullying).

Cyberbullying, online grooming, access to inappropriate images and sexting are just some of the ways in which digital technology can negatively impact on children’s and young people’s lives.

Ofcom figures show that 16% of 8–11 year olds and 31% of 12–15 year olds have at some point seen online content that they found worrying or nasty. To safeguard children and young people, it’s essential that teachers and parents/carers educate them about staying safe online and what they should do if something goes wrong.

This area of the RSE Hub signposts to resources and guidance information for teachers, parents/carers, and children and young people on internet safety issues. It also signposts to organisations that can offer advice and support.

Primary

The internet plays an increasingly central role in children’s lives, exposing them to new and varied risks. In 2017, Ofcom reported that 79% of 5–7 year olds go online for around 9 hours a week, and that 94% of 8–11 year olds go online for nearly 13.5 hours a week.

As the internet plays such a key role in children’s lives today, schools should use strategies that help them develop safe online habits from an early age, while ensuring that they recognise the positive aspects of using the internet as well as the dangers.

To stay safe online, children should:

  • understand the importance of maintaining a positive online reputation;
  • be aware of the benefits and potential risks of sharing personal information online;
  • be able to communicate respectfully with people they know and trust;
  • know that other people’s feelings can be hurt if something unkind is said about them online;
  • understand the harmful consequences of cyberbullying and know who to talk to if it happens to them;
  • understand early on that it is okay to say no to anyone who asks them to do something they feel bad about, in real life or online;
  • avoid talking to strangers online and be aware that some people are not who they say they are online;
  • tell a trusted adult if they feel uncomfortable or frightened by something they have experienced online; and
  • realise that spending too much time online can have a negative impact on them.

Useful Links

Here are some links that we think are particularly useful for this topic:

Primary Internet Safety Links299 KB - uploaded 01-04-2019

eSafetyOur page features information and a video on embedded opportunities for e-safety in the curriculum.

Department of Education – Circular 2016/27 Online SafetyDE’s circular includes principles for keeping pupils and the wider school community safe online and for prioritising online safety - education-ni.gov.uk

NSPCC Learning – Share Aware resources for schools and teachersAimed at Key Stage 2 pupils, these resources cover topics like the dangers of chatting to strangers online and where to access help when things go wrong - learning.nspcc.org.uk

Thinkuknow – Band Runner game and websiteAimed at 8–10 year olds, this game can help children learn how to stay safe from the online risks they might encounter and distinguish between safe and unsafe behaviours - thinkuknow.co.uk

Thinkuknow – Play Like Share: animated series and resourcesFeaturing three animated films and supporting activities for 8–10 year olds, this resource can help children learn how to stay safe from sexual abuse, exploitation and other online risks - thinkuknow.co.uk

Post-Primary

As the internet plays such a key role in young people’s lives today, schools should use strategies that help them develop safe online habits, while ensuring that they recognise the positive aspects of using the internet as well as the risks.

To stay safe online, young people should:

  • know strategies to protect their online identity and profiles;
  • understand the importance of maintaining a positive online reputation;
  • be aware of the benefits and potential risks of sharing personal information online;
  • understand that how they present themselves online can have positive or negative consequences;
  • understand the harmful consequences of cyberbullying and who to talk to if it happens to them or their friends;
  • be aware that a person’s online identity might not be who they are in real life;
  • be aware that their online identity can be copied or modified;
  • understand the benefits and drawbacks of manipulating digital images or content;
  • understand how media can shape ideas and opinions;
  • be able to describe and understand some of the pressures that people can feel when using social media, for example peer pressure and fear of missing out (FOMO);
  • be able to challenge inappropriate online messages and behaviour;
  • know how to contribute positively to online discussion and debate;
  • know the laws governing online behaviour, for example sharing explicit sexual images;
  • realise that spending too much time online can have a negative impact on them; and
  • know how to report an online issue.

Useful Links

Here are some links that we think are particularly useful for this topic:

Post Primary Internet Safety Links148 KB - uploaded 01-04-2019

Love Life Resources for young people with learning disabilities

eSafetyOur page features information and a video on embedded opportunities for e-safety in the curriculum.

Childnet International – ResourcesCovering topics like cyberbullying, sexting, peer pressure and self-esteem, teachers can filter these resources by Key Stage, audience and key words - childnet.com

LifeSkills – Online reputation (11–16)Created with Barclays, this lesson plan covers topics like how misusing social media can create a negative digital footprint and the importance of internet privacy - barclayslifeskills.com

NSPCC Learning – Safeguarding and child protection online trainingThese online training courses can help teachers learn about different aspects of child protection and safeguarding such as keeping children safe online - learning.nspcc.org.uk

UK Council for Child Internet Safety – Sexting in schools and colleges: Responding to incidents and safeguarding young peopleCovering topics like preventative education, working with parents and reporting imagery to providers, this guidance can help schools and colleges to deal with the issues that sexting can present - gov.uk

UK Safer Internet CentreFeaturing teaching resources, education packs, resources for young people and Safer Internet Day films, this website aims to help children and young people stay safe online - saferinternet.org.uk