Volleyball

KEY STAGE 1

BEGINNER

Movement

In volleyball, it is important that the players are able to hit the ball into the air and attempt to keep it in the air. This section helps develop the hand motion to hit the ball up into the air.

Introduction
Give each player a balloon and mark out an area for the players to move within. Ask the players to first stand still in a space and hit the balloon into the air. Then ask the players to do this while moving around the area fast, slow, backwards etc.

Volleyball - beginner Key Stage 1

Game: Hands off my Balloon
Mark out an area using cones. Give each player a balloon and ask them to hit the balloon into the air while moving around the area. The idea of the game is to hit the balloon into the air and keep it in the air, while at the same time trying to knock another player’s balloon out of the area. If a player’s balloon gets knocked out of the area or touches the ground, then that player is out. The last person with their balloon still in the area is the winner.

INTERMEDIATE

Keep the Ball Up

The players need to be able to keep the volleyball in the air. This section allows players to get used to the feel of a volleyball and the technique for hitting the ball up.

Introduction
Mark out an area for the players to move within. Ask the players to begin moving within the area. As the players are moving within the area, introduce a volleyball. The players must pass the volleyball among themselves and keep it in the air. If the players are capable, introduce another ball and then another.

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Game: Keep it Up
Split the group into teams of three or four. Mark out an area for each team. Give the teams a volleyball each. After starting the game, ask the players to keep their ball in the air but each player is only allowed one touch before a teammate must hit it. When a team's volleyball hits the floor or goes outside the area, then the team is out. The team remaining at the end is the winning team.

ADVANCED

Over the Net

The players need to be able to hit the volleyball back to the opposing team or to another player in their own team. This section allows players to get used to passing the ball and the technique for hitting the ball over the net.

Introduction
Demonstrate to the players how to hit a volleyball. Firstly, show them how to serve a volleyball then how to return a volleyball. Pair up the players and give them one ball between each pair. Ask the players to practise both these techniques between each other.

Volleyball - advanced Key Stage 1

Game: Over the Net
Keep the players in the same pairs. Ask the players to practise serving the ball and returning the ball over the net to their partner. At first, keep the net low when the players are beginning. Once a pair have dropped the ball or hit the net, then that pair are out. The pair remaining at the end get a point. In the next round, increase the height of the net and ask the players to continue. The pair with the most points are the winners.

Make it inclusive!

Use a flat, hard playing surface.
Ensure the adult to player ratio is appropriate so that every player has a chance to be involved.
Divide players with difficulties evenly between teams.
Remind players that there is a mixture of abilities on the court and it is important not to run into each other.
Allow wheelchair users and those with difficulties and impairments more time.
Use sitting volleyball to introduce concepts of the game then if appropriate begin to play standing volleyball.

Reduce the size of the court for players with mobility difficulties.
Lower the net, if necessary.
If several wheelchair users are playing, they may need to use a bigger ball.
Use a ball that is appropriate for the group of players, for example use a sponge ball, beach ball or a balloon if necessary.
A player with mobility difficulties could be a server.
Allow players to catch the ball first if they have difficulties with motor skills and co-ordination.
If some players are wheelchair users, mark out an area for them to stay within to avoid collisions with other players who are not wheelchair users.

Demonstrate the game using sign language, such as Makaton.
Pair up with a ‘hearing’ player or an adult who will guide the player with hearing difficulties.
Use a large countdown clock or visual sign to show that game time has started or stopped.
Hold up a sign to show the game has started/ended.
Use visual cues to indicate different events during the game, e.g. that the whistle has blown.

For players with minor visual impairments use a brightly coloured ball that contrasts with the playing surface.
Ensure that team bibs clearly contrast with each other.
Make sure that cones and equipment marking the boundaries of the playing area are brightly coloured and clearly contrast with the playing surface itself.
Use an audible ball (ball that makes a sound) with players who have a serious visual impairment.
Allow an adult or ‘seeing’ player to guide them around the court using directions or a hand on their shoulder.

KEY STAGE 2

BEGINNER

Volleying Ball

The players need to be able to hit the volleyball back to the opposing team or to another player in their own team. This section allows players to get used to the feel of a volleyball and the technique for hitting the ball.

Introduction
Demonstrate to the players how to hit a volleyball. Firstly, show them how to serve a volleyball then how to return a volleyball. Pair up the players and give them one ball between each pair. Ask the players to practise both these techniques between each other.

Volleyball - beginner Key Stage 2

Game: Over the Net
Keep the players in the same pairs. Ask the players to practise serving the ball and returning the ball over the net to their partner. At first, keep the net low when the players are beginning. Once a pair have dropped the ball or hit the net, then that pair are out. The pair remaining at the end get a point. In the next round, increase the height of the net and ask the players to continue. The pair with the most points are the winners.

INTERMEDIATE

Two vs. Two Game

It is important to get the players used to the concept of the volleyball game. If the game has only two players in each team, the players will get used to passing the ball and also competing against another team. In this game, stress the importance of hitting the ball up into the air to the other team.

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Game
Using the same pairs as the previous game, allow the players to take part in a two vs. two game. Set out a court using cones, if there are no line markings, and use a net at an appropriate height (perhaps even start with no net). Explain the main rules in volleyball to the players but also relax some rules if necessary, for example serving, if the players are finding it difficult then they can serve with an underarm throw. Explain to the players that they have a maximum of three touches to return the ball over the net. Explain to the players that if the ball does not land in the marked area then the team who hit the ball out lose a point. The idea of this game is to develop the necessary skills for a full game.

ADVANCED

Game

Now that the players have had the opportunity to practise the essential skills necessary for a game, introduce a game with more players in each team and adjust the net height. Also introduce the idea of grounding the ball on the other team’s side of the net, making it more difficult to return the ball.

Volleyball - advanced Key Stage 2

Game
Now that the players know the basic concepts they need for playing a game of volleyball, introduce the serving rules and show them where their serve should be from (behind the back boundary line of the court). Divide the group so there are five or six players in each team. A team may touch the ball consecutively three times, but no one player can touch the ball consecutively twice. A team will gain a point by grounding the ball on the other team’s side of the net or if the other team makes a fault, for example if they do not return the ball within three touches or the ball touches the net.

Make it inclusive!

Use a flat, hard playing surface.
Ensure the adult to player ratio is appropriate so that every player has a chance to be involved.
Divide players with difficulties evenly between teams.
Remind players that there is a mixture of abilities on the court and it is important not to run into each other.
Allow wheelchair users and those with difficulties and impairments more time.
Use sitting volleyball to introduce concepts of the game then if appropriate begin to play standing volleyball.

Reduce the size of the court for players with mobility difficulties.
Lower the net, if necessary.
If several wheelchair users are playing, they may need to use a bigger ball.
Use a ball that is appropriate for the group of players, for example use a sponge ball, beach ball or a balloon if necessary.
A player with mobility difficulties could be a server.
Allow players to catch the ball first if they have difficulties with motor skills and co-ordination.
If some players are wheelchair users, mark out an area for them to stay within to avoid collisions with other players who are not wheelchair users.

Demonstrate the game using sign language, such as Makaton.
Pair up with a ‘hearing’ player or an adult who will guide the player with hearing difficulties.
Use a large countdown clock or visual sign to show that game time has started or stopped.
Hold up a sign to show the game has started/ended.
Use visual cues to indicate different events during the game, e.g. that the whistle has blown.

For players with minor visual impairments use a brightly coloured ball that contrasts with the playing surface.
Ensure that team bibs clearly contrast with each other.
Make sure that cones and equipment marking the boundaries of the playing area are brightly coloured and clearly contrast with the playing surface itself.
Use an audible ball (ball that makes a sound) with players who have a serious visual impairment.
Allow an adult or ‘seeing’ player to guide them around the court using directions or a hand on their shoulder.

KEY STAGE 3

Game Development

Introduction
To develop the skills players need for a game of volleyball, it is important that they have lots of opportunities to practise volleying the ball in a rally. At this stage, it is important that the rules of volleyball are relaxed, if necessary, to allow a rally to take place. This will give the players a chance to practise the skills they require. The rules can then be applied as the players become more able.

Inclusion and Accessibility
While we would like all pupils to be included in Physical Education along with the others in their class, this is not always possible when it comes to playing the full version of the sport.

If a pupil has physical disabilities that mean they cannot safely take part in the game along with the other pupils in their class, then this pupil should be given the opportunity to take part in other physical activity. For example, a class could be split into groups, with some pupils practising the drills and others playing the game. The smaller group could practise the skills needed for the sport, or for the disabled version of the sport, alongside the rest of the class. These smaller groups would work in rotation, giving everyone an opportunity to play the sport and practise their skills.

Alternatively, some pupils may prefer to do a physical activity that they are particularly interested in, for example practising the drills needed for a sport they play outside of school.

Volleyball - Key Stage 3

Tips

  • Start with sitting volleyball until the players become more confident with hitting the ball.
  • Use balls that are slower and softer than volleyballs, until the players have gained some confidence.
  • Use an area and net of appropriate size for the court, depending on the group’s ability.
  • Mark out the court and explain what the different lines are for (but be sure to use flat and non-slip cones if there are no court lines).
  • If a player is having difficulty with the game, perhaps let them start off a rally by throwing the ball to a team.
  • Ensure players of a similar level are placed against each other.
  • Allow players to have more than one touch, if necessary.
  • Ensure the time set for each half is suitable for the age and ability of the players.
  • Ensure player safety. Be careful if there are wheelchair users playing alongside non-wheelchair users.

Make it inclusive!

Use a flat, hard playing surface.
Ensure the adult to player ratio is appropriate so that every player has a chance to be involved.
Divide players with difficulties evenly between teams.
Remind players that there is a mixture of abilities on the court and it is important not to run into each other.
Allow wheelchair users and those with difficulties and impairments more time.
Use sitting volleyball to introduce concepts of the game then if appropriate begin to play standing volleyball.

Reduce the size of the court for players with mobility difficulties.
Lower the net, if necessary.
If several wheelchair users are playing, they may need to use a bigger ball.
f several players are wheelchair users, they need to use a bigger ball.
Use a ball that is appropriate for the group of players, for example use a sponge ball, beach ball or a balloon if necessary.
A player with mobility difficulties could be a server.
Allow players to catch the ball first if they have difficulties with motor skills and co-ordination.
If some players are wheelchair users, mark out an area for them to stay within to avoid collisions with other players who are not wheelchair users.

Demonstrate the game using sign language, such as Makaton.
Pair up with a ‘hearing’ player or an adult who will guide the player with hearing difficulties.
Use a large countdown clock or visual sign to show that game time has started or stopped.
Hold up a sign to show the game has started/ended.
Use visual cues to indicate different events during the game, e.g. that the whistle has blown.

For players with minor visual impairments use a brightly coloured ball that contrasts with the playing surface.
Ensure that team bibs clearly contrast with each other.
Make sure that cones and equipment marking the boundaries of the playing area are brightly coloured and clearly contrast with the playing surface itself.
Use an audible ball (ball that makes a sound) with players who have a serious visual impairment.
Allow an adult or ‘seeing’ player to guide them around the court using directions or a hand on their shoulder.